Topical steroids withdrawal treatment

The most common side effect of topical corticosteroid use is skin atrophy. All topical steroids can induce atrophy, but higher potency steroids, occlusion, thinner skin, and older patient age increase the risk. The face, the backs of the hands, and intertriginous areas are particularly susceptible. Resolution often occurs after discontinuing use of these agents, but it may take months. Concurrent use of topical tretinoin (Retin-A) % may reduce the incidence of atrophy from chronic steroid applications. 30 Other side effects from topical steroids include permanent dermal atrophy, telangiectasia, and striae.

A common mistake is to be too cautious about topical steroids. Some parents undertreat their children's eczema because of an unfounded fear of topical steroids. They may not apply the steroid as often as prescribed, or at the strength needed to clear the flare-up. This may actually lead to using more steroid in the long term, as the inflamed skin may never completely clear. So, you may end up applying a topical steroid on and off (perhaps every few days) for quite some time. The child may be distressed or uncomfortable for this period if the inflammation does not clear properly. A flare-up is more likely to clear fully if topical steroids are used correctly.

An Alternative Treatment

Decreased tear meniscus in dry eye.
As an alternative to steroids—or as an adjunctive therapy—topical cyclosporine can also be used to control inflammation in dry eye disease. While cyclosporine does not demonstrate the rapid anti-inflammatory effect of steroids, it carries fewer risks and is safe for long-term use.
Because of their complementary efficacy and safety profiles, many practitioners often begin dry eye treatment by prescribing both topical steroids and cyclosporine. Following the recommendation of the Asclepius Panel, the use of combination therapy is instituted with the topical corticosteroid, Lotemax (loteprednol etabonate ophthalmic suspension %, Bausch + Lomb) and Restasis (cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion %, Allergan). 24 The Asclepius Panel recommends practitioners begin early treatment with an anti-inflammatory agent (such as Lotemax) four times a day to improve symptoms and to prevent disease progression. After two weeks, the frequency of the corticosteroid is reduced to twice daily and supplemented with Restasis twice a day. Treatment with loteprednol was stopped after day 60, while cyclosporine treatment is continued.

It is important to use the correct amount of topical steroid for your eczema, as instructed by your healthcare professional. Topical steroids should be applied with clean hands so that the skin just glistens. It can sometimes be difficult to judge how much steroid to use and there are guidelines on the amount required to cover body areas that are affected by eczema. These are based on the Finger Tip Unit (FTU), and explained in detail in our fact sheet which you can download as a pdf from the related documents to the right of this page.

Topical steroids withdrawal treatment

topical steroids withdrawal treatment

It is important to use the correct amount of topical steroid for your eczema, as instructed by your healthcare professional. Topical steroids should be applied with clean hands so that the skin just glistens. It can sometimes be difficult to judge how much steroid to use and there are guidelines on the amount required to cover body areas that are affected by eczema. These are based on the Finger Tip Unit (FTU), and explained in detail in our fact sheet which you can download as a pdf from the related documents to the right of this page.

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